Tuesday, December 27, 2011

CARL Website outage

Currently we are experiencing a web page outage. If you need access to our databases, see the following links. We apologize for the inconvience.

Search Summon using this URL
http://carl.summon.serialssolutions.com/

CARL databases through the E-Journal Portal
http://fw8pk7vf4q.search.serialssolutions.com/

CARL's catalog
http://comarms.ipac.dynixasp.com/ipac20/ipac.jsp?profile=carlcgsc&reloadxsl=true#focus

CARL's Digital Library
http://cgsc.cdmhost.com/cdm4/search.php
fw8pk7vf4q.search.serialssolutions.com

CARL's Alternate web address
http://www.cgsc.edu/cac2/CGSC/CARL/

Friday, December 23, 2011

CARL Website outage

Currently we are experiencing a web page outage. If you need access to our databases, see the following links. We apologize for the inconvience.

CARL databases through the E-Journal Portal
 
CARL's catalog
 
CARL's Digital Library

Tuesday, December 6, 2011

New Virtual Reference Center from Gale

With Virtual Reference Center researchers can access more than 5,000 (and growing) eBooks in virtually any subject, including health, business, careers, history, literature, biography, science and many more. User's can navigate a list of subjects and titles from the homepage; view titles without performing a search; export citations  (EndNote, ProCite, Reference Manager) as well as generate (APA, MLA, tagged format); bookmark and return to virtually any spot in the research via a persistent URL; translate content into more
than 11 languages such as Spanish, French and Portuguese; and  utilize the ReadSpeaker technology (text-to-speech) which allows text to be read aloud to users and downloaded in MP3 format.

So if your having trouble finding  eBooks and looking for starting information why not try the GALE Virtual Reference Center.

You can also find a link to the Virtual Reference Center on our Find Articles the Articles - Galegroup option on our webpage.



Monday, December 5, 2011

Kansas EZ Library replaces Overdrive ebook content

Kansas EZ Library is the new name for Kansas’ econtent, which will include audiobooks and ebooks. This service will replace the current Overdrive e-book and audio book the Kansas State Library currently provides.

Here is the link to the new Kansas EZ Library. http://www.kslib.info/digitalbooks

The current subscription to Overdrive through Kansas State Library will end today Dec 5th, 2011. If you have an AKO account you can  still have access to Overdrive through the army library site.



Wednesday, November 23, 2011

Thanksgiving Message

  As a reminder, the library will be closed on Thursday in observance of Thanksgiving. We will open Friday at our usual time.

We hope you and your family  have a safe and happy Thanksgiving!


Tuesday, November 22, 2011

Some Thanksgiving Trivia

What food was served at the first Thanksgiving Dinner?

There is no evidence that turkey was eaten at the first Thanksgiving, a three-day meal shared between the pilgrims and Wamponoag tribe in 1621. It is more likely that they ate venison and a lot of seafood.

Today, though, we sure eat a lot of turkey. According to a study done by the National Turkey Association, Americans eat 690 million pounds of turkey during Thanksgiving 2007. That is equal to the weight of the entire population of Singapore.

An estimated 46 million turkeys are eaten on Thanksgiving (the birds weigh, on average, 16 pounds). That is more than double the amount eaten on Christmas (22 million) and Easter (19 million). In 2010, more than 244 million turkeys were raised and about 226 million of those were consumed in the United States.

What Utensil was missing from the first Thanksgiving day dinner?


The fork.

What did they use to eat their meal with?

A knife, a spoon, and their fingers.
The fork was not brought by the pilgrims. Governor Winthrop of Massachusetts introduced it 10 years later, but it did not really catch on until the 18th century.

 In what year did Football start being a Thanksgiving tradition?

It all started in 1934, when the Detroit Lions was bought by G.A. Richards. Trying to build up the fan base for the team, he scheduled a game for Thanksgiving Day to play the Chicago Bears, who at the time were world champions.

The game sold out and was broadcasted live on radio. And with that huge success,the tradition began. Since then, the Detroit Lions have played 67 Thanksgiving games!


What year did Macy's famous parade start?

The parade began in 1924 with 400 employees marching off from Convent Avenue and 145th Street in New York City. During this time the parade was accompanied not with the oversized ballons of our favorite cartoon characters, but with live animals borrowed from the Central Park Zoo -- from camels to elephants.




Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Refworks Brownbag

Create your bibliography with the click of a mouse. OK, so it’s not that easy, but RefWorks will help you organize your sources, cite them and create a bibliography for your thesis or other long paper. Come and learn the tricks on Wednesday Novemeber 16th from 12:45 to 13:45 in Room 112.

Tuesday, November 1, 2011

5 Facebook Privacy Settings You Must Review Now


The number of places where you can get tagged on Facebook continues to grow, but you can give yourself the right to approve all tags before they can appear on the site — and the ability to do this has gotten more refined than ever.
There are actually five different options you can enable that together limit whether anyone’s effort to tag you can go live on the site.
To get to these five options, fist click the down arrow in the upper right-hand corner of the screen and select “Privacy Settings.”
Then, scroll down to the heading “How Tags Work” and click on the linked words “Edit Settings,” located to the right.
The pop-up window shown above appears, listing the five options for controlling tags.
All but the middle one default to “off,” and you’ll want to decide whether to turn them on so you can:
  • Receive prompts to approve or decline everything your friends post on your wall or link you in before the item can appear on your profile.
  • Similarly vet all tags that your friends add to your content before they can become visible on your profile.
  • Opt in or out of being suggested to your friends when they are tagging photos.
  • Permit or disallow your friends to include you in their check-ins to places.
That middle option has more choices than simply on or off. Here you get to decide on how visible your profile or timeline content is.
The options here include “public,” “friends,” “friends of friends,” or “custom.”
So you can choose from any of those lists to create a customized audience for your timeline or profile.
We recommend that you make your timeline or profile visible to friends and consider blocking current and former coworkers.
Even if you have cool colleagues, remember that timeline can serve up everything ever posted to your profile since you joined the site — you can alter this as well by selecting different pieces of content to make visible, but it’s best to start with limited visibility as a default and then make specific posts public as you go.
Which privacy settings, if any, have you used on Facebook so far?

Monday, October 31, 2011

Halloween History

Halloween is considered by most in the United States as a fun holiday, mostly for children, but it has roots in ancient religions and folklore, including paganism, ancient Roman religions, early Catholic Christianity, Irish folklore, and even British politics! Children and adults alike enjoy this holiday today, with funny costumes, candy, and parties, while some countries observe this time as a remembrance of departed loved ones and religious saints.

Around 2,000 years ago, the Celts, who lived in what is now the United Kingdom, Ireland, and northern France, had a festival commemorating the end of the year. Their New Year was November 1, and this festival was called Samhain, pronounced sow-en. The end of their year signaled the end of summer, the end of the harvest season, and the beginning of a long, hard winter that often caused many deaths of animals and people. Weaker livestock were often killed and eaten during this holiday, since most likely, they would not survive the winter anyway. Because of this, and the cruel winter to come, this time of year signified death to the Pagan Celtics. They believed the night before the New Year, that the wall between the living and the dead was open, allowing spirits of the dead, both good and bad, to mingle among the living. Some of these spirits were thought to possess living people, cause trouble, ruin crops, or to search for passage to the afterlife.
Samhain was considered a magical holiday, and there are many stories about what the Celtics practiced and believed during this festival. Some say the spirits that were unleashed were those that had died in that year, and offerings of food and drink were left to aid the spirits, or to ward them away. Other versions say the Celts dressed up in outlandish costumes and roamed the neighborhoods making noise to scare the spirits away. Many thought they could predict the future and communicate with spirits as well during this time. Some think the heavily structured life of the Pagan Celtics was abandoned during Samhain, and people did unusual things, such as moving horses to different fields, moving gates and fences, women dressing as men, and vice versa, and other trickeries now associated with Halloween. Another belief is that the Celtics honoured, celebrated, and feasted the dead during Samhain. A sacred, central bonfire was always lit to honor the Pagan gods, and some accounts say that individual home fires were extinguished during Samhain, either to make their homes unattractive to roving spirits, or for their home fires to be lit following the festival from the sacred bonfire. Fortunes were told, and marked stones thrown into the fire. If a person's stone was not found after the bonfire went out, it was believed that person would die during the next year. Some Celts wore costumes of animal skulls and skins during Samhain. Faeries were believed to roam the land during Samhain, dressed as beggars asking for food door to door. Those that gave food to the faeries were rewarded, while those that did not were punished by the faeries. This is reported to be the first origin of the modern "trick or treat" practice.

In the First century A.D., the Roman Empire had taken over most of the Celtic lands. The Romans had two festivals also celebrated at the same time of year as Samhain. One was Feralia, also in late October, was the Roman day honouring the dead. The second festival was for Pomona, the Roman goddess of trees and fruit. Pomona's symbol was the apple. These two festivals were combined with Samhain in the Celtic lands during the four hundred years the Roman Empire ruled over the Celts. The goddess Pomona's apple might be the root of the Halloween tradition of bobbing for apples.

Over the next several hundred years, Christianity had spread to include the lands inhabited by the Celtics and the Romans, but the festival of Samhain was still celebrated by the people. The Christian church reportedly did not like a festival with Pagan roots practiced by Christians, so a replacement was needed. Pope Boniface IV designated May 13 as All Saints Day to honour dead church saints and martyrs. Samhain continued to be celebrated, so in 835 A.D., Pope Gregory IV moved the holiday to November 1, probably to take attention away from the Pagan Samhain festival and replace it. Since All Saints Day was sanctioned by the church, and related to the dead, the church was happy, but many Pagan traditions of Samhain continued to be practiced, including bonfires, parades, and dressing up in costume. All Saints Day was also known as All Hallows, or All Hallowmas (Hallowmas is Old English for All Saints Day). Since Samhain was celebrated the night before November 1, the celebration was known as All Hallows Eve, and later called Halloween. In the year 1000 A.D., the church designated November 2 as All Souls Day, to honour the dead who were not saints, and they eventually became combined and celebrated as Hallowmas.

On All Souls Day in England, the poor would "go a-souling". They would go door to door asking for food, and in return, would pray for the souls of their dead relatives. It was widely believed at the time that the souls of the dead would await passage into heaven until enough people prayed for their souls. The Christian church encouraged this practice to replace the old Pagan tradition of leaving cakes and wine out for the spirits of the dead. The poor would be given "soul cakes", which were pastries made for those who promised to pray for their dead relatives. In some cultures, soul cakes would be given in exchange for a performance or song as well. Children eventually adopted this practice, and were given food, ale, or money.
Jack o'lanterns are a Halloween staple today, with at least two historical roots. The early Pagan Celtic peoples used hollowed out turnips, gourds, or rutabagas to hold an ember from the sacred bonfire, so they could light their home fires from the sacred bonfire. Another tale from folklore gives jack o'lanterns their name. In Irish myth, a man known as "Stingy Jack", who was a swindler and a drunk, who asked the devil to have drink with him. Jack convinced the devil to change himself into a coin so he could pay for the drink, but Jack put the coin in his pocket next to a silver cross, which trapped the devil, preventing him from changing himself back. Jack agreed to free the devil on the condition that the devil would not bother Jack for a year. Next year, Jack tricks the devil into climbing a tree to fetch a piece of fruit. While the devil is up the tree, Jack carves a cross into the trunk, preventing him from climbing back down the tree. In order to get out of the tree, the devil promised Jack not to seek his soul any more. When Jack died, he was not allowed into heaven, because of his drunken and swindling ways, but he was not allowed into hell either, because the devil kept his word. Taking pity on Jack, the devil gave him an ember to light his way in the dark, putting it into a hollowed out turnip for Jack to carry on his lonely, everlasting roamings around the Earth. People from Ireland and Scotland would make "Jack o'lanterns" during this season to scare away Stingy Jack and other evil spirits wandering about.

Over the next several centuries, superstitions about witches and black cats were added to to the folklore and legends of Halloween. Cats were thought of as evil, especially black cats, and were killed by the thousands in Medieval times, possibly contributing to the Black Plague, due to the shortage of the rat's natural enemy, the cat. During this time, the church created the belief that evil witches existed.

In the 1500's, Martin Luther created the Protestant Church, which had no saints, so no All Hallows Day was allowed. On November 5, 1606, Guy Fawkes was executed for attempting to blow up England's Parliament. Fawkes, along with an extremist Catholic organization he belonged to, wanted to remove the Protestant King James from his throne. The English wasted no time to have a celebration to replace All Hallows Day, so Guy Fawkes Day was celebrated from then on. Many traditions of All Hallows Day were practiced, such as bonfires, and children asking for money, but the reasons why were different. Bonfires were known as "bone fires" originally, because they were lit in order to burn an effigy of the Catholic pope, burning his "bones". Two hundred years later, the effigy of the pope was replaced by an effigy of Guy Fawkes, prompting children to go door to door, asking for a "penny for Guy", so they could make their effigy to burn. In the New World, the colonists celebrated Guy Fawkes Day for a while, but as the colonies became the United States of America, Guy Fawkes Day fell by the wayside.

In the United States, Halloween was not a popular observance in early United States history, as most of the early settlers were Protestant. At the time, Halloween was considered mostly a Catholic, Episcopalian, and Pagan holiday, and therefore largely ignored. In the southern colonies, such as Virginia and Maryland, there were some Halloween customs observed. The first common events were called "play parties". These parties got neighborhoods together to celebrate the harvest, dance, sing, tell stories of the dead, tell fortunes, and have pageants for children in costume. By the mid 1800's, immigration increased, and many Irish immigrants, mostly Catholics fleeing the potato famine, brought many Halloween traditions with them. Jack o'lanterns found a new face, the pumpkin, which was very plentiful in the New World. Catholics and Episcopalians sought to preserve their traditions, so started an effort in the late 1800's to popularize and make their holidays known to the general population. By campaigning to put these holidays (Halloween and All Saints Day) on public calendars, magazines and newspapers started to publicize these holidays, and soon became popular in the United States more as a community and family holiday, rather than one of great religious and supernatural importance.
By the mid twentieth century, Halloween turned into a secular holiday, community centered with parties city-wide, parades, and great costumes. Halloween is mostly aimed to children, but young and old enjoy this holiday, with events and parties for both children and adults. Starting in 1950, the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) started a campaign for children to collect money at Halloween for underprivileged children around the world. Halloween is the United States' second largest commercial holiday, spending approximately $6.9 billion a year.

In Other Countries, such as Mexico, Latin America, and Spain observe All Saints Day and All Souls Day with a three day celebration starting on the evening of October 31, through November 2. In most areas of Mexico, November 1 is set aside to honour dead children, and November 2 to honour those who died as adults. Starting in mid October, shops are filled with decorations, flowers, toys made like skeletons and other macabre shapes, sweets, pastries, and candies shaped like bones, coffins, and dead bodies in preparation for the festivities. Called "Day of the Dead", the spirits of relatives are supposed to visit their families homes. An area of the home is cleared away, and an altar is erected decorated with flowers, photographs of the deceased, candies and pastries shaped like skulls inscribed with their name, candles, and a selection of the deceased's favorite foods and drinks. Even after dinner cigarettes and liquors are provided for the dear departed's after dinner enjoyment. Incense is burning to help the spirits find their way home.
In preparation for November 2, the graves of the deceased are cleaned, painted, and decorated for the occasion. Families gather November 2 for a festive family reunion. Food, drinks, and tequila are brought along, along with sometimes even a mariachi band. In some areas, fireworks announce an open-air mass, the most solemn time of the Day of the Dead. Many customs vary depending on the particular city, town, or culture, but all over Mexico, Latin American, and Spain, the Day of the Dead is considered a celebration of their departed family.

Eastern Europe's celebration of All Saints Day are usually spent by praying most of the day, praying to the Saints and thanking God. Often, they visit their departed family members at the cemeteries. Slovakia, Hungary, Lithuania, Slovenia, and Poland observe All Saints Day as a public holiday, but unlike Mexico and the United States, this day is a somber day of remembrance and reflection. France, Italy, and Germany are celebrating Halloween, American style, as does Canada. Ireland celebrates American style, but a common town bonfire, a remnant of Celtic days is still lit. England still celebrates Guy Fawkes Day on November 5 with bonfires, burning effigies of Guy Fawkes, and fireworks.

Halloween Traditions

Costumes: Dressing in costumes has its roots in the Pagan Celtic roots of Samhain. One theory is they dressed as ghouls to fool evil spirits let loose on October 31, so they would not be possessed by these spirits. Another theory is they dressed in costume just for fun, and to make mischief. Yet another theory is that faeries would dress as beggars asking for food, which would also be the origins of the "trick or treat" practice. After the Catholic Church replaced Samhain with All Saints Day, people would dress as dead Saints and devils for their festivities.

Trick or Treat: This practice might have had it's start in the legend from Celtic days that faeries would dress as beggars going from door to door asking for food, and those that did not show hospitality would be harshly dealt with by these magical faeries. On All Souls Day, the poor would beg for "Soul Cakes" (sweet pastries) in exchange for prayers for their departed loved ones, expediting their passage to heaven. Sometimes costumed groups would sing and perform in exchange for food, ale, or money. In the United Kingdom, Guy Fawkes effigies to be burned were prepared by children, going door to door, asking for a penny for Guy, on Guy Fawkes Day.

Bonfires: These have two origins. The first is the sacred ritual of extinguishing home fires, and one sacred bonfire is lit in each town for the end of the New Year. Some say the reason home fires were extinguished is to scare away evil spirits from homes, while others say that home fires were supposed to be lit from embers from the sacred bonfire to start the New Year. The second origin was from Guy Fawkes Day in the United Kingdom to burn effigies of the Catholic pope, and later of Guy Fawkes himself.

Apples: A seasonal fruit, and also the symbol of the Roman goddess Pomona, commonly thought at the time to possess qualities of knowledge, resurrection, and immortality. Bobbing for apples, peeling a long apple peel, and other manipulations of the fruit were thought to foretell the future, on this night of Samhain.

Jack o'lanterns: From the Irish folk tale of Jack, who tricked the devil, but was not allowed in heaven or in hell. The devil, taking pity of Jack, gave him an ember to light his way on his eternal walks on Earth, carried in a hollowed out turnip. Because of their size and availability, pumpkins were substituted for turnips in the United States. The Celtics did use a hollowed out rutabaga to carry an ember from the sacred Samhain bonfire home to light their home fires, but the significance and relation to the Irish tale of Jack is unknown.
Ghost Stories: Ghost stories probably have their roots in the original Celtic belief that the spirits of the dead (both good and bad) wandered the Earth on October 31 (Samhain). Later, when the church replaced Samhain with All Saints Day and All Souls Day, the dead were remembered, and spoken about. In the United States today, they are used to amuse and scare children (and some adults) to get them in the "spirit" of Halloween.
For more info check out the History Channel website.

Wednesday, October 19, 2011

Special Report - Afghanistan 10 years on

The beginning of this month marked 10 years since military operations started in Afghanistan. In recognition, the editors and analysts at Jane's have produced a 65pp report detailing operations and analysis.

The report includes:
* detailed analysis of insurgent tactics & targets generated by JTIC's database (now 134000 events and growing!)
* profiles of the Taliban and Haqqani Network groups
* US war spending by sector and category & forecast spending
* Selected IHS Jane's articles on both insurgent threats and ISAF's counter efforts.

Additionally, a few quotes from our experts: Peter Felstead: "The degree to which NATO is ultimately seen to prevail in Afghanistan is now increasingly in the hands of the Afghan National Security Forces themselves, but one thing is certainly true: Afghanistan has changed NATO as much as NATO has changed Afghanistan. Coalition warfare has come of age."

Dan Wasserbly: "From a kit perspective, Afghanistan has proven a difficult environment for which to equip coalition troops. The prevalence of improvised explosive devices has pushed militaries to field heavier armoured vehicles that can shield against blasts, but the mountainous terrain necessitates more mobile trucks and lighter personal gear."

Jeremy Binnie: The Afghan war was justified by the need to prevent the country being used by international terrorists. Some argue that this objective has been achieved, with Al-Qaeda largely displaced to Pakistan's tribal areas, where it has suffered numerous blows, while the Taliban leadership has promised that it will not be an international threat when it re-establishes control over Afghanistan. However, a myriad of foreign jihadist groups continue to operate in the tribal areas and may relocate to Afghanistan in the future. It remains far from clear whether the Taliban is capable of breaking all ties with its foreign allies and preventing them from using Afghanistan as a base for activities that threaten foreign states."

Matthew Henman: The increasing ability of the Taliban and allied groups to conduct high-profile attacks in Kabul repeatedly calls into question the ability of Afghan security forces to protect the seat of government let alone achieve the basic counter-insurgency precept of projecting security, stability, and the rule of government across the remainder of the country."

James Brazier: "Pakistan is positioning itself as the sole intermediary capable of forging peace with the Taliban. However, Pakistan's efforts to interpose itself into Afghanistan's peace process have created dangerous questions over the nature of Pakistan's relationship with the militants."

Terry Pattar: "Time is running out to leave Afghanistan in an acceptable shape that would justify the time, money, and lives spent in expanding the mission from counter-terrorism to state building. With major doubts over the current Afghan government and whether they will be able to maintain stability after NATO withdrawal, the US now has to choose if they are going to back Karzai or find an alternative. Either way, there will have to be some form of rapprochement with elements of the Taliban if Afghanistan is not going to descend back into civil war."

Click here for the complete report.

Friday, October 14, 2011

Super Computer Trivia

Which was the first supercomputer?
a. CDC 6600
b. Cray-1
c. IBM 7030 Stretch
d. UNIVAC

Give up? Well the answer is ...

The CDC 6600 from Control Data Corp., is generally recognized as the first
supercomputer, according to Wikipedia. Built in 1964, it was designed by
Seymour Cray, and ran at about 1 megaflop (a million floating point
operations per second). That was about three times faster than the previous
fastest computer, the IBM 7030 Stretch. (Today, an iPhone 3Gs can run at
about 6.42 megaflops.)

The UNIVAC, which first appeared in 1951, was the first commercial computer
produced in the United States.

Seymour Cray left CDC in 1972 to start his own company. The first Cray-1
supercomputer was installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 1972.

Thursday, October 6, 2011

Columbus Day

On Monday Oct 10th, we will celebrate Columbus day,just a reminder that CARL's Hours on that day will be from 10:00 to 17:00. In honor of his voyage here are some facts.

For decades and decades, American history books and school teaching told us that Christopher Columbus discovered America. What those books and teachings did not give credit to was the fact that Native Americans were already here first and truly discovered America. It also gave little mention to the fact that Nordic explorers had travelled down the eastern cost of Canada thousands of years earlier.

Today, we celebrate Columbus day for what it accurately is. Columbus did discover the existence of the New World for Europeans who until then, believed the world was flat and ended somewhere in the Atlantic. And, the focus is more upon discovery of the "New World", and less upon Columbus himself.

Did You Know? Columbus day is sometimes referred to as "Discoverer's Day".

Some key facts (in case you forgot them since grade school):
  • Columbus Discovered America in 1492. He originally set sail on August 3, 1492, but had trouble with the ships, stopping at the Canary Islands for a month. The ships left the Canary Islands on September 3,1492.
  • He travelled with three ships: The Nina, the Pinta and the Santa Maria
  • While Columbus was an Italian, he could not find funding in Italy, so he turned to the King of Spain. King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella provided the funding.
  • He did not land on the U.S. mainland. He landed on an island in the Caribbean. While many believe he landed on San Salvador, there is still debate on which island he originally landed on.

Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Corruption/Anti-Corruption in Afghanistan: a Selected Bibliography


The U.S. Army War College Library is pleased to announce the publication of Corruption/Anti-Corruption in Afghanistan: a Selected Bibliography, compiled by Lenore K. Garder, Research Librarian.

The purpose of this bibliography is to introduce some of the resources readily available at the U.S. Army War College or on the Internet about corruption and anti-corruption efforts in Afghanistan. 

click below to view:

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